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Holden Commodore VT VX VY VZ repair manual 1997 - 2007 - Ellery - NEW

About the Commodore VT Series

With the VT Commodore of 1997, Holden looked again to Opel in Germany for a donor platform. The proposal was to take the Opel Omega B and broaden the vehicle’s width and mechanical setup for local conditions. In the early days, Holden considered adopting the Omega as is, save for the engines and transmissions, and even investigated reskinning the existing VR/VS architecture.Later on, the VT bodywork spawned a new generation of Statesman and Caprice limousines, and even went as far as resurrecting the iconic Monaro coupé from the 1960s and 1970s.

The VT heralded the fitment of semi-trailing arm independent rear suspension as standard across the range, a significant selling point over the rival Falcon.However, when originally carried over from the Opel, the design was simplified by removing the toe control links, standard equipment on the six-cylinder Omega since 1987. This allowed distortions to the suspension camber angle and toe under heavy load, such as heavy towing or when travelling over undulated surfaces, leading to excessive rear tyre wear. Holden's performance arm HSV re-added the toe control link on the flagship GTS 300 model. The 1999 Series II update replaced the venerable Holden 5.0 litre V8 engine with a new 5.7 litre Generation III V8 sourced from the United States. The V8 was detuned to 220 kilowatts (300 hp) from the original US version, but would receive incremental power upgrades to 250 kilowatts (340 hp) throughout its time in the Commodore, before finally being replaced by the related Generation 4 in the VZ. The supercharged V6 was uprated to 171 kilowatts (229 hp) from the VS. Safety wise, side airbags became an option for the Acclaim and higher models, a first for Holden.

From the onset, parent company General Motors was interested in incorporating a left-hand drive Commodore in its Buick lineup, culminating in the unveiling of the Buick XP2000 concept car in 1996. Although this idea was ultimately abandoned, the GM-funded project allowed Holden to enter into a range of left-hand export markets. Thus began the Commodore's rapid expansion into parts of Indochina, the Middle East and South Africa badged as the Chevrolet Lumina, to Brazil as the Chevrolet Omega 3.8 V6, and later on with the Monaro to the United States, where it was sold by Pontiac under the GTO nameplate. In its home market, the VT Commodore was awarded its fourth Wheels Car of the Year for 1997. It found ready acceptance in the market as many buyers steered away from the slow selling Ford AU Falcon, becoming the best selling Commodore to date and cementing its place as number one in Australian sales.

About the Commodore VX Series

The VX update from 2000 featured a revised headlamp design.The VT's rear tail lamp panel was replaced by two separate light assemblies. Conversely, the luxury-oriented Berlina and Calais sedans continued using a full-width boot-lid panel incorporating the registration plate and tail lamps. This series also introduced the first Holden Ute, designated VU. Earlier models were instead entitled "Commodore utility". An updated Series II was launched in early 2002, featuring revised rear suspension system now equipped with toe control links to address the VT's issues.

Safety played a substantial role in the development of the VX model. Bosch 5.3 anti-lock brakes were made standard on all variants, a first for an Australian manufactured car; and traction control was made available on vehicles equipped with manual transmission. Extensive research was undertaken to reduce the effects from a side-impact collision through modification of the B-pillars. The risk presented by a side-impact collision in a VX fitted without side airbags is reduced by 50 percent when compared to a similarly specified VT model.

About the Commodore VY Series

The AU0 million VY mid-cycle update of 2002 represented the first major styling shift since the 1997 VT. Designers discarded the rounded front and rear styling of the VT and VX models, adopting more aggressive, angular lines. The same approach was applied to the interior, whereby the curvaceous dashboard design was orphaned in favour of an angular, symmetrical design. Satin chrome plastic now dominated the façade of the centre console stack, and high-end models received fold-out cup holders borrowed from fellow GM subsidiary Saab. Holden turned towards German electronics manufacturer Blaupunkt to source audio systems—an arrangement that remains in place today.

Engineering wise, Holden kept the changes low key. A revised steering system and tweaked suspension tuning were among some of the changes to sharpen handling precision. Further improvements were made to the Generation III V8 engine to produce peak power of 235 kilowatts (315 hp) for sports variants. In a bid to recapture the market for low-cost, high-performance cars, Holden created a new SV8 specification level. Based on the entry-level Executive, the SV8 inherited the V8 mechanical package from the SS but made do without the luxury appointments and was sold at a correspondingly lower price. Holden also experimented by releasing a limited edition wagon version of its high-performance SS variant, of which only 850 were built. The Series II update added a front strut bar as standard to the SS, which was claimed to increase rigidity and hence handling. As became the trend, the update raised V8 power, now up 10 kilowatts (13 hp). Amendments in the remaining models were confined to new wheels, trims and decals, however, the Calais has taken on a sports-luxury persona as opposed to the discrete luxury character seen in previous models. This repositioning in turn affected the Berlina’s standing. The once second-tier model now became the sole luxury model, only overshadowed by the more expensive Calais. Coinciding with the VY II models was the first four-door utility model dubbed the Holden Crewman. Crewman’s underpinnings and body structure while somewhat unique, shared a fair amount in common with the Statesman, One tonner and the two-door Ute.

Sensing a new potential market, Holden developed an electronically-controlled all-wheel drive system for the VY platform dubbed Cross Trac at a cost of AU5 million.Unveiled after the Series II changes in 2003, the first application of the new system was the Holden Adventra, a raised VY wagon crossover. The system was only available in combination with the V8 and automatic transmission. Holden chose not to spend extra engineering resources on adapting the all-wheel drive system to the V6, due to be replaced in the upcoming VZ model. Unfortunately for Holden, the Adventra fell well short of expected sales, despite modest targets.

Holden Commodore VT VX VY VZSeries Ellery Service and Repair Manual 1997-2007 - 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

 

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